Good project management skills are not enough

Good project management skills are not enough

It was said seriously and with a clear message: “I am a qualified and skilled project manager.” To give it a context; this was during a two day project management course where I had worked the groups hard on a case study project. They were on the ‘home straight’ looking at project monitoring and control. I suggested that there were … Read More > Related Posts: Do you need more skilled project staff? 360 assessment for project staff What do you need to change to be more effective? Do you search for development needs of project managers? Work breakdown structure – HOW?

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How to write the perfect progress report – dos and don’ts

How to write the perfect progress report – dos and don’ts

If you work as a project manager, chances are that you have completed dozens of progress reports during your career – if not hundreds! But how effective have they been? Have you had a clear purpose when writing the reports, for instance by wanting your stakeholders to take certain action as a result of them? Or did you fill them in because it was one of those routine tasks that had to be done? Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net You may have been very conscientious and particular when filling in your reports, but unfortunately not everyone is, and as a result the weekly status report becomes one of those artifacts that is part of the process without adding much value.  Top mistakes Some of the classic mistakes that project managers make is that they include too much static information and not enough about what the real project issues are. In that way the report is not a true reflection of what is really going on. If you just write about what happened during the last reporting period and what you will do during the next reporting period, without mentioning how that compares to plan and what the real risks and issues are, there is no incentive for executives to pay attention to it. In many cases the report is even attached in an email without any context or description, meaning that executives who rely on smartphones are unlikely to ever get to the information.

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You Can’t Afford a Project Manager on Your Project?

You Can’t Afford a Project Manager on Your Project?

Read the original: You Can’t Afford a Project Manager on Your...

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8 Bad Habits – Creating and Maintaining Your Project Schedule

8 Bad Habits – Creating and Maintaining Your Project Schedule

I have always believed that you can learn as much or more from challenges and problems on projects as you do from successes. It is amazing how much you as a project manager contribute to the project’s challenges (in a bad way). The project schedule is a good example of where a project manager can have the best intentions in the world, and yet they create a schedule that is difficult to understand and nearly impossible to maintain. The bad thing about a poorly constructed project schedule is that it is something you have to live with the entire project life cycle. I have been on more than one project where we decided it was best to have a “do over” on the schedule than continue to struggle along with the one we were using. There are a handful of traps that project managers fall into when creating a project schedule, either because at the time it seems like their approach is a “shortcut”, or they don’t understand the scheduling tool well enough to know any better. These bad habits make the schedule difficult keep up to date to reflect progress on the project, as well as changes in the work to be performed.

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Do you have the courage to face up to your project?

Do you have the courage to face up to your project?

We all know that managing a project can be emotionally draining. On a bad day we spend most of our time resolving issues, mitigating risks and dealing with conflict. This can be draining because the stakes are high and because we want to do our best to protect the schedule. After all, our job is to remove blockages and fix problems so that the project can be delivered without delays. But might there be another reason why we’d want to find a solution to a risk or an issue? Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net Could it be, for instance, that we subconsciously find conflict, uncertainty and question marks so uncomfortable that we intuitively want to move away from them? Could it be that we hurry to find a ‘quick fix’ simple because we want to get away from an emotionally difficult situation

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