How to set yourself up for success with a positive and empowering mindset

How to set yourself up for success with a positive and empowering mindset

As you continue on your journey to become a better project manager and leader you may be considering which habits to kick and which habits to start embracing. But you are also aware that your good intentions – and new habits – may not stick.  In order to create a new habit and achieve your goals, you have to change from the inside out. You have to take control of your internal world so that your thoughts and feelings can positively influence your outer reality. The best way to do that is to  foster a positive and empowering mindset  that will allow you to pursue your goals without hesitation.  Let’s examine what this kind of empowering mindset looks like. I am in control and I choose my own responses The most empowering belief you can adapt is to know that you are in control and that you always have a choice. You choose your own beliefs, you choose what you want to focus on and you choose the decisions and the actions that you take. This is a very powerful belief system because it means that you take full responsibility for your actions without having to deflect blame onto others.

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Project Delivery – 5 Areas Ripe for Regular Detox

Project Delivery – 5 Areas Ripe for Regular Detox

In the lead up to Christmas we’re all a little like headless chickens. We push and rush to close out or tidy up loose ends before everyone disappears on their well-deserved breaks and to give us piece of mind. Why do we do this mad rushing about? And, why is it not limited to the festive season? Perhaps it’s habit. Perhaps we’re reflecting those around us. Perhaps we think it’s the right thing to do.

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The yin and yang of project leadership™ 

The yin and yang of project leadership™ 

Provide your team with the best conditions for growth In order to provide your team with the best conditions for growth and enable them to generate optimal results on the project, you must do two things; 1) You must demand a great outcome, and 2) You must enable your team to generate that outcome. You have to ask challenging questions, set high standards and expect the best quality on the one hand, and on the other you have to provide the team with all the support it needs to deliver. The ability to fully support and enable your team to grow and at the same time challenge and stretch it, is a skill that can be learnt and honed over time. Let us look at how you can do that by using the concepts of yin and yang. Yin-leaders support; yang-leaders challenge Yin symbolizes the feminine elements such as listening, supporting, coaching and maintaining stability. Supportive yin-leaders have a deep respect for people and want to understand what drives and motivates each person.

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So, what have I learned this year II?

So, what have I learned this year II?

I wrote the first part of this blog article in late December and this week sees more learning from 2014. NOTE: these are elements I have seen during the year, not made up! So, to repeat my introduction from the last blog posting: ‘As the year draws to a close, I sat last Sunday and decided it was time to … Read More > Related Posts: So, what have I learned this year 1? Reflection – 400 Blogs The 7 deadly sins of project management Lessons learned or lessons identified…? Who are your good project management role models?

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The school of hard knocks

The school of hard knocks

It’s said that you learn more from failures than you do from successes.  Here’s a project I learned a lot from The brief was to project manage the procurement and implementation of a large IT system.  Seemed straight forward enough, I’d done it before… The challenge: Resources were tight Project team included some VERY ‘strong’ characters Project team were under-performing Project sponsor was disengaged Project had to enable substantial service cost reductions (1/3 of a multi-million pound budget) We conducted soft market testing, produced a very detailed requirements specification and went to market.  We were unable to appoint a supplier because all suppliers failed to meet all ‘essential’ requirements. We revised the specification, but the relationship between myself and the sponsor had deteriorated to the point of no return and I was ‘ freed up to work on something else ‘.  As you can imagine, this was not pleasant.

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