3 things you need to make better, faster, project decisions (Part 1)

3 things you need to make better, faster, project decisions (Part 1)

What do you need to make better, faster, project decisions? I think there are 3 essential “things” if I can call them that. They are: Good data, at regular intervals, from trustworthy people (or sources) The ability to make a timely decision under uncertain conditions A project governance structure that allows decision-making at the appropriate level In this, and in two subsequent posts, I will explain what I mean by each one. That said, let’s begin with the first— Good data, at regular intervals, from trustworthy people. Good data…… What does good data tell us, and, where do we find it?  Good data tells us about the Past , the Present , and the Future . We typically find data about the past in project reports.

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PM leadership tips from someone who buries people for a living

PM leadership tips from someone who buries people for a living

That someone is Steve Muro who heads the National Cemetery Administration (NCA) responsible for 131 U.S. national cemeteries where more than 3 million veterans and their families are buried. The NCA is part of the Department of Veterans Affairs headquartered in Washington, DC. whose motto reads “for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow, and his orphan. These words were spoken by Abraham Lincoln during his Gettysburg Address and are now on a pair of metal plaques at the entrance to the VA. Next time you’re in Washington, take a short stroll down Vermont Ave NW. They’re really quite inspiring.

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¿Como se define "Terminado"?, y ¿por que es importante para el proyecto?

¿Como se define "Terminado"?, y ¿por que es importante para el proyecto?

Ahora que estoy dando de nuevo la clase de preparacitión para el examen de CAPM, me encuentro en la necesidad de explicar a mis alumnos lo crírico que es para el éxito de proyecto que nuestro equipo entienda claramente cuando estará terminado el proyecto y como “se ve” el producto final de nuestro esfuerzo. Ademas, el tema permite dar seguimiento a lo expresado en el post anterior (PENDIENTE): Podemos expresar el avance de nuestro proyecto, ahora hay que saber cuando hemos terminado. Traigo entonces un artículo publicado por Wayne Grant, en Projects at Work el pasado 23 de enero de 2014: ¿Como definir a nuestro equipo lo que significa “hecho” (o “terminado”)? Como dice Wayne, la adecuada definición de “Hecho” aporta transparencia a la forma en que un equipo trabajo, por lo que proone una lista de comprobación (o un taller) para ayudar a los equipos a acordar y publicar una definición de “Hecho”. Wayne dice que en su trabajo constantemente le sorprende que los equipos de trabajo no tengan una definición de “Hecho”. La idea surge de los métodos Agiles: la Definición de “Hecho” (Definition of Done – DoD) es una lista de verificación de actividades útiles que se llevan a cabo por el equipo de desarrollo de software cada vez que se implementa una historia de usuario.

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As a PM are you on the human hamster wheel?

As a PM are you on the human hamster wheel?

We’ve all witnessed the poor hamster on his hamster wheel running furiously and literally going nowhere. Many people I’ve known through the years use this as an analogy for how they feel about certain projects they’ve worked on. Obviously, the message is that there is a lot of energy expended but ultimately it all leads nowhere. Well, I’d like to show you (literally) a different perspective of the human hamster wheel. In the Boiler Gallery in Brooklyn, New York there are two performance artists who are living on a 25-foot wheel made from wood, steel, and furniture. This 10-day event features Ward Shelley and Alex Schweder who are sharing two living unites arrayed over the hamster-wheel-like sculpture. Shelley’s on top and Schweder is on the bottom.

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IT Project Managers, the insurance industry, and fear

IT Project Managers, the insurance industry, and fear

Many have heard of the famous remark by U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt “there’s nothing to fear but fear itself.” Well, that quote just took on a new twist in the global insurance industry when executives surveyed in that sector say they fear their current systems will not be able to handle the regulatory and financial challenges of their business. In fact, in a survey conducted by Northern Trust , 70% of the senior investment managers surveyed admit they are concerned about the future. What’s going on? Well, in the U.S. there’s increasing business and systems complexity related to the Dodd-Frank Act; and, in Europe, the sector has to comply with the Solvency II directives.

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