If You Don’t Go Within, You Go Without

If You Don’t Go Within, You Go Without

Guest blog post by Mark Bashrum, ESI International Organizations would be well advised to remember this adage, not for its metaphysical implications, but for its significance on a project management level. Finding external talent is important to any staffing strategy, but the latest ESI International Annual Project Manager Salary & Development Survey shows project organizations need to look inward and focus more on developing the talent they already have. As the following reasons demonstrate, it’s better to develop and promote from within rather than hire from the outside. Time is Not on Your Side The salary survey shows that the ramp-up time to get an experienced project manager up to speed in a new environment can take longer than you might expect. On average, bringing an otherwise experienced project manager up to a level of effectiveness in a new organization takes between six and 10 months depending on the size and complexity of the projects they are managing. Cost of Buy vs. Build There is a definite cost advantage to developing and promoting young and mid-level project managers

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Are you breaching copyright?

The day was going really well. An early morning swim, emails dealt with (swiftly) and then the post arrived… That’s when my day went off plan. In the post a letter arrived from a company saying that my company, Project Agency had breached copyright on a photo that was within a .pdf document. They demanded £510 (approximately $875 – “the … Read More > Related Posts: Introduction to Project Management course – Free!! I do not take account of my time. Do you? Olympic security debacle – lack of controls? Who’s got my dictionary?

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5 ways to boost your AND your PMO’s value (Part 1)

5 ways to boost your AND your PMO’s value (Part 1)

Many PMO Directors want to provide value and actually think they are based on their “inside-out” view of the world. The “outside-in” perspective tells a completely different story, one that for many unsuspecting PMO Directors will have a very bad ending: their PMO will be disbanded and they will be looking for work. For the past two years, ESI International has conducted comprehensive global surveys of the State of the PMO, and analyzed scores of others. For more than four years it has engaged PMO Heads from every industry sector in round table events. And what the surveys reveal will startle, and educate, PMO Heads in every geography and industry sector. In short, what a PMO Head thinks they should be doing is, in fact, the last thing they should be spending your time on. I’ve taken those findings and boiled them down to 5 key takeaways; ways, in which value can be boosted

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Who determines the PMO’s value?

Who determines the PMO’s value?

It is clear from my work in the area of PMO startup and development that there are three key stakeholder groups that determine the PMO’s value. They are the─ Executive(s) under whose organization the PMO function and responsibility reside Project and program managers who either directly report to the PMO or who are heavily influenced by it Clients (internal or external) who are serviced by the project and program managers who deliver the new product or service resulting from their effort What does each group value? The key question each PMO Head has to answer is “what do each of these groups value?” In other words, what are they looking for from the PMO to facilitate their work and provide contributions to the organization?  In my experience, PMO Heads often fail to answer this question either because they think they know what each group needs, or, they assume that all key stakeholder groups’ needs are the same. In fact, this is not the case. The needs of the executive are entirely different from those of the project and program managers; in fact, the executive’s perspective is actually more aligned with those of the clients than with the project and program managers whose view tends to be somewhat more focused on the work effort itself rather than broad organizational goals and outcomes.  Thus, this difference of perspective is where we can look to gain helpful insight into ways that the PMO Head can boost not only his or her own value in the organization, but the PMO’s as well. In fact, the two are generally considered inseparable. Which group is the most important

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6 ways the PMO can become the hub of PM development

6 ways the PMO can become the hub of PM development

PMO’s looking to increase their value proposition, which many need to do, can make a big impact by becoming the hub of professional development for the project and program managers in their organizations whether those folks report directly to them or not. Based on my work with PMOs in many different industries here are ways any PMO Head can make this happen.   1.  Make a concerted effort to “own” the core competencies and skills profiles for project and program management   If H.R. will not relinquish control, then make sure you work closely with them in this area. After all, if the right core skills are not defined, there is no basis for a structured and systematic approach to developing these professionals.

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