Leaving Rosetta Stone – My top 7 lessons learned

Leaving Rosetta Stone – My top 7 lessons learned

So … I’m leaving Rosetta Stone. Tomorrow is my last day. It has been an incredible 7 and a half years. I’m moving to Utah, my home state, and will be working as a Senior Product Manager for the Missionary Department of the LDS Church. It will be an interesting shift from project management to product management, but I am very excited about this opportunity! Project Managers make it a practice to gather lessons learned after each project. Here are my top lessons learned during my tenure at Rosetta Stone.

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The Fundamental Skills No PM Can Ignore

The Fundamental Skills No PM Can Ignore

Finding great new opportunities for project management work has been tough for a while. With a reduction in roles and a shift towards finding someone who has it all, you can be forgiven for a feeling a little frustrated at how to change this status quo.  Perhaps it is time to look beyond your PM ability and take a look at another set of skills that PMs should pay attention to – skills that are utilised first at an interview and then beyond in the workplace. Organisations are looking beyond the project management experience and intelligence you have – your competition for opportunities are becoming knowledgeable in areas that are highly sought after – yet rarely taught. So what are these additional skills a project manager needs? Business skills, or ‘soft skills’, are now the biggest differentiator when it comes to recruitment – skills that are so crucial that no prospective (or self-respecting) project manager can afford to ignore if they are to maximise their opportunities. Business skills start to manifest themselves early on in the recruitment process, especially when preparing for an interview. Chances are you have already been selected for an interview because your previous skills and experience look like a good fit for the organisation

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Rosetta Stone Project Management Community of Practice

Rosetta Stone Project Management Community of Practice

Did you know that Rosetta Stone has an internal Project Management Community of Practice? All Rosetta Stone employees interested in the discipline of project management and how it is applied within Rosetta Stone to achieve business value are welcome to attend. For more information, contact me! For those of you who work in other organizations, sharing information about project management or any other discipline can be easy and fun. We just picked the 5 most relevant topics, picked speakers to present them, picked dates to conduct each session, and then published the list of sessions. So far, we have had 2 of the 5 sessions planned for 2013. If you’re a PM and want an idea of what a community of practice could look like, here is our list of topics and the dates we’re conducting these sessions: Portfolio Management and Corporate Strategy Thursday, February 7 th , 12:10-1:00 pm EST An introduction to portfolio management, highlighting the current project intake and prioritization process. Measuring value and success through post-implementation reviews to guide in the selection of future projects.

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Are we really investing in the right things to improve project management? I have one question….

Are we really investing in the right things to improve project management? I have one question….

                   

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Does your project team know how the project aligns to organizational strategy? Does it really matter?

Does your project team know how the project aligns to organizational strategy? Does it really matter?

There’s an old story that goes like this. A man was walking through a stone yard where three men were hammering and breaking large stones into certain shapes. When he asked the first stone cutter what he was doing he replied “I’m busting rocks.” When he asked the second, he said “I’m creating a stone block.” And, when he asked the third, the man said “I’m building a cathedral.” (By the way, if you were to ask members of your project team, or other key stakeholders, what the purpose of the project was, what would be their reply? I bet you’d receive a range along the lines of the three stone cutters above.) Here, we have three different perspectives of the same job. Is the third man better off? Is the organization better off because he sees the “bigger picture”?

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